Sunday, September 10, 2017

Have you ever been there?
Have you ever visited Aswan?

Also named Temple of Mandulis

Discover Kalabsha Temple, an Ancient Egyptian temple dedicated to the god Mandoulis and remodelled during the Greco Roman period.


It was originally located at Bab al-Kalabsha (Gate of Kalabsha), approximately 50 km south of Aswan.

Kalabsha Temple
The temple was situated on the west bank of the Nile River, in Nubia, and was originally built around 30 BC during the early Roman era. While the temple was constructed in Augustus's reign, it was never finished.

The temple was a tribute to Mandulis (Merul), a Lower Nubian sun god (Nubian form of Horus).

An image of Mandulis from the Temple of Kalabsha in Nubia
It was constructed over an earlier sanctuary of Amenhotep II. 

The temple is 76 m long and 22 m wide in dimension.


While the structure dates to the Roman period, it features many fine reliefs such as "a fine carving of Horus emerging from reeds on the inner curtain wall" of the temple.

aA fine carving of Horus emerging from reeds on the inner curtain wall

From Kalabsha's "sanctuary chambers, a staircase leads up to the roof of the temple" where one can see a splendid view of the temple itself and the sacred lake.


With help from Germany, the temple of Kalabsha was relocated after the Aswan High Dam was built, to protect it from rising waters on Lake Nasser. The temple was moved to a site, located just south of the Aswan High Dam. 

The process of moving the temple took more than two years.
The temple of Kalabsha was the largest free-standing temple of Egyptian Nubia (after Abu Simbel) to be moved and erected at a new site.
Although the building was never completed, it "is regarded as one of the best examples of Egyptian architecture in Nubia.


Nice to be together

 جميل أن نبقى سويا


Thank you
Manal Raafat

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

A description for the Interior of the Great Temple at Abu Simbel


Massive statues of Ramses II adorn the pillared hall of the Great Temple at Abu Simbel. 

At the end we see the sanctuary of the temple. 

Of the four seated gods residing there we only discern two from this angle: Amun and the deified Ramses.

Interior of the Great Temple at Abu Simbel


This temple is the greatest of the seven rock-cut temples which Ramses constructed in Nubia in the 13th century BC. 

It was not seen by Europeans until the 19th century, when it was discovered by Burckhardt in 1813 and penetrated by Belzoni in 1817.


It was moved to higher ground during the construction of the Aswan High Dam in the 1960s, to avoid flooding by Lake Nasser.

Copied
Thanks

Princess Ankhnesneferibre

Ankhnesneferibre was the daughter of Psamtik II, a pharaoh of the 26th dynasty (6th century BC), which was based in the Delta town of Saite. 

(Saites: name of the 26th dynasty of Egyptian pharaohs, who opened up their country to foreign traders, mercenaries, and settlers.).

Ankhnesneferibre was sent to Thebes to hold the office of ‘God’s Wife of Amun’, which was the highest office in the priesthood of the temple of Amun in Karnak.

She is wearing a so called Nubian wig, a headdress that is built up of layers of tightly curled plaits and which is thought to imitate the thick hairstyles of the Nubian people. 



Princess with Nubian wig

This statue can be seen in the Nubian Museum in Aswan.

Thanks
Manal Raafat

Princess Ankhnesneferibre - الأميرة أنخنسنفيريبر


كانت الأميرة أنخنسنفيريبر إبنة الفرعون بسامتيك الثاني، فرعون من الاسرة 26th التى حكمت فى القرن السادس قبل الميلاد، والذي كان مقره في مدينة دلتا سايتس (Saites).
("Saites" سايتس: اسم الأسرة السادسة والعشرين من الفراعنة المصريين، الذين فتحوا بلادهم للتجار الأجانب والمرتزقة والمستوطنين).


أُرْسِلَتْ أنخنسنفيريبر إلى طيبة لتحكم مكتب "زوجة الله آمون"، الذي كان أعلى منصب في الكهنوت من معبد آمون في الكرنك.


فى الصورة ترتدي ما يسمى الشعر النوبى المستعار، وهو غطاء للرأس على هيئة عدة طبقات من الضفائر المضفرة  بإحكام, والتي يعتقد أنها تقليد لتسريحات الشعر للنوبين. 

الأميرة مع الشعر النوبي المستعار 

يمكن مشاهدة هذا التمثال في المتحف النوبي بأسوان.

شكرا لكم 
منال رأفت